How to shear a sheep

Cee wants to see some images of tools this week. I spotted this in the Museum in Perigueux.

As the card states, it’s a pair of scissors for shearing sheep. They’ve been in the museum since 1914, but date from some time in the late 19th century at a guess. They are made of iron, no doubt by a village blacksmith.

Nowadays, sheep are sheared using electric clippers, which is obviously a lot quicker than this traditional method – although only a few years ago we watched our neighbour and his wife shearing one of their sheep with a pair quire similar to these.

Next year, the World Sheep-Shearing Championship (yes, there is such a thing) will be held in the nearby town of Le Dorat. I sense a major photo opportunity.

Cee’s Fun ‘Foto’ Challenge: Tools

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Old

This week, Frank at Dutch Goes The Photo! has returned to the theme of ‘Old’.

As this year is, of course, the centenary of the end of World War I, this image seems appropriate. It is a French Army helmet of the period, now housed in the Museum at the Chateau des Ducs in Nantes.

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Old

W is for Wrought Iron

This wrought iron balcony dates from about 1740 and is now on display in the Chateau des Ducs museum in Nantes. The pattern is complex enough on its own but the shadows add a further dimension.

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: W or X

Tuesdays of Texture: Sea Chest

Lots of textures in this detail of the ornate iron lock of a wooden sea chest, found in the Chateau des Ducs Museum in the French city of Nantes.

Tuesdays of Texture 16 May 2017

Antique

Finding something over 50 years old for this week’s edition of Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge isn’t the hard part. Just looking in the mirror solves that problem.

However, to spare all of us the ordeal of a self-portrait, here are three photographs taken in a chateau in Sarlat, which is set up as it might have looked in the sevententh century (way more than fifty years ago).

This old book (Proceedings of the Committee on French Africa – riveting stuff) is artfully placed on a desk, but I liked the cropped version showing the book itself and the (also artfully placed) reading glasses:

Over50Yrs-3

Sepia seemed the most appropriate colour cast for this formal dining-room:

Over50Yrs

But my favourite image is this one. A quasi-impressionist view through some very old window-panes, the antiquity of which is attested by the fact that they’re full of bubbles, showing that they were made in the days before glaziers had mastered the techniques of producing absolutely clear glass in mass-market quantities:

Over50Yrs-2