52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 38 Rule of Odds

This week’s challenge is to employ the ‘rule of odds’. That’s simply the oft-observed phenomenon that an image with an odd number of items is inherently more aesthetically pleasing than an even number. Here, three old doors are better than two – especially when helped out by a dramatic sky.

52WeekSmartphoneChallenge: 38 Rule of Odds

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 37 Seasons

Autumn colours at the important Roman site of Vindolanda, near Hadrian’s Wall in northern England.

52WeekSmartphoneChallenge: 37 Seasons

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 36 Habits

This week, the Smartphone Challenge is “Some habits are good, and some are bad. Your inspiration this week is either”.

To the best of my knowledge, I am entirely devoid of good habits, so that narrows it down a bit.

However, I have it on the very highest authority that, among a plethora of bad habits, my alleged inability to close cupboard doors properly ranks very highly in terms of irritation-generating capacity.

Dunno what all the fuss is about….

52WeekSmartphoneChallenge 36 Your Habits

 

 

 

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 35 Symmetry Portrait

This week’s Smartphone Challenge required a bit of lateral thinking. This is what was asked for:

“Symmetry is a strong compositional technique most often used in landscapes and architecture. So break the mould by using Symmetry in a portrait”

This posed two difficulties, the first of which is that I don’t really ‘do’ portraits. Secondly, other than a reflection, I struggle to see symmetry as a natural element of a portrait. I’ve seen images that have been doctored to make the two halves of a face look absolutely symmetrical (in essence, the right side is a flipped duplicate of the left side). The effect is vaguely unsettling and certainly unnatural.

But then, so you could argue, is this. I took a selfie (in front of one of Madame’s more colourful quilts) and then used the kaleidoscope effect in Pixelmator to create what, it’s fair to say, is quite a striking image.

But it’s nothing if not symmetrical.

52 WeekSmartphoneChallenge: 52 Symmetry Portrait

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 34 Colour without colour

This week’s Smartphone Challenge is to tell a colourful story, but in monochrome.

This clematis is actually a delightful shade of purple, but in black and white it contrasts very well with the green leaves behind. The monochrome treatment also helps to highlight the intricacy at the centre of the flower.

52WeekSmartphoneChallenge: 34 Colourful in B&W

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 33 Tell A Lie

Lies, all lies. Our local pharmacy doesn’t sell rhino horn and it’s not rhino horn anyway.

52WeekSmartphoneChallenge 33

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 32 Frame within a frame

This week in the Smartphone Challenge we’re asked for a shot that’s framed naturally.

Can do. At the side of our garage a line of trees separates our property from a neighbour’s field, in which he grazes some of his horses.

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 32

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 31 Friends and Family

Last weekend was my mother’s 90th birthday. To mark the occasion, we had a little tea party on our terrace for family and a couple of friends.

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 31 Friends and Family

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 30 Exit

This week’s instalment of the Smartphone Challenge is thankfully rather more straightforward than some we’ve seen recently. The theme is ‘Exit’.

So that’ll be a door then. Like this rather tatty specimen in Bellac.

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 30 Exit

 

 

 

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 29 Depth of Field

Week 29 of the Smartphone Challenge is a bit of a strange one. ‘Use DOF to make a subject appear part of something larger’.

I know what they mean and I even know how it can be achieved with a normal camera – you use a very narrow aperture to give a deep depth of field so that both foreground and background are in focus.

The problem is that depth of field on a smartphone camera is fixed. The camera on my iPhone 11 has two settings: wide (ƒ1.8) and ultra wide (ƒ2.4). Narrow they ain’t.

No doubt someone out there can tell this bear of little brain how to do it, but for now I will have to settle for this trompe l’oeil photo of an old watering can, seen at a vide grénier in Blond.

Taken head on, the spout can’t be seen so the rose looks like it’s part of something larger that is the can itself.

52WeekSmartphoneChallenge: 29 Depth of Field