52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 42 Work

This was where I spent the last few years of my working life – my office at the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority. If only my desk here now was so tidy…

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 42 Work

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 41 Colour Theory

The last few weekly Smartphone Challenges have been relatively straightforward, but Week 41 is a bit of a toughie.

“Color Theory is a huge part of a composition that most photographers don’t explore. So it is time to explore it. Use Color Grading to create an image that looks like it is a still from a movie.”

Having read that, I wasn’t much wiser, so here’s what I’ve done. This photo was taken in August, just after sunset, with a full moon partly veiled by thin cloud cover, so the image was pretty much monochrome.

I pulled back some of the detail in Lightroom to give a hint of detail in the trees. At a stretch, you could imagine the opening scene of one of those fifties horror movies where a car carrying two cheerful teenage couples breaks down just outside a dark, looming mansion – and, like a bunch of idiots, they go and knock on the front door….

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 41 Colour Theory

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 40 Modern Convenience

Don’t ever come between me and my iPad….

52WeekSmartphoneChallenge: 40 Modern Convenience

52 Week Photo Challenge: 39 The Elements

This week is about the elements. Fortunately, not the ones that go in the Periodic Table but the more traditional categories – rather more amenable to artistic interpretation.

Arguably, this image  – of a striking cloud formation seen over our house in the gathering dusk – shows three of the five classical elements: Air (obviously), Water because that’s what clouds are made of, and Earth, which is what Brokedown Palace is sitting on (and built from).

52WeekSmartphoneChallenge: 39 Elements

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 38 Rule of Odds

This week’s challenge is to employ the ‘rule of odds’. That’s simply the oft-observed phenomenon that an image with an odd number of items is inherently more aesthetically pleasing than an even number. Here, three old doors are better than two – especially when helped out by a dramatic sky.

52WeekSmartphoneChallenge: 38 Rule of Odds

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 37 Seasons

Autumn colours at the important Roman site of Vindolanda, near Hadrian’s Wall in northern England.

52WeekSmartphoneChallenge: 37 Seasons

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 36 Habits

This week, the Smartphone Challenge is “Some habits are good, and some are bad. Your inspiration this week is either”.

To the best of my knowledge, I am entirely devoid of good habits, so that narrows it down a bit.

However, I have it on the very highest authority that, among a plethora of bad habits, my alleged inability to close cupboard doors properly ranks very highly in terms of irritation-generating capacity.

Dunno what all the fuss is about….

52WeekSmartphoneChallenge 36 Your Habits

 

 

 

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 35 Symmetry Portrait

This week’s Smartphone Challenge required a bit of lateral thinking. This is what was asked for:

“Symmetry is a strong compositional technique most often used in landscapes and architecture. So break the mould by using Symmetry in a portrait”

This posed two difficulties, the first of which is that I don’t really ‘do’ portraits. Secondly, other than a reflection, I struggle to see symmetry as a natural element of a portrait. I’ve seen images that have been doctored to make the two halves of a face look absolutely symmetrical (in essence, the right side is a flipped duplicate of the left side). The effect is vaguely unsettling and certainly unnatural.

But then, so you could argue, is this. I took a selfie (in front of one of Madame’s more colourful quilts) and then used the kaleidoscope effect in Pixelmator to create what, it’s fair to say, is quite a striking image.

But it’s nothing if not symmetrical.

52 WeekSmartphoneChallenge: 52 Symmetry Portrait

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 34 Colour without colour

This week’s Smartphone Challenge is to tell a colourful story, but in monochrome.

This clematis is actually a delightful shade of purple, but in black and white it contrasts very well with the green leaves behind. The monochrome treatment also helps to highlight the intricacy at the centre of the flower.

52WeekSmartphoneChallenge: 34 Colourful in B&W

52 Week Smartphone Challenge: 33 Tell A Lie

Lies, all lies. Our local pharmacy doesn’t sell rhino horn and it’s not rhino horn anyway.

52WeekSmartphoneChallenge 33