Tuesday Photo Challenge: Trail

This trail, running through the woods at Beecraigs Country Park in central Scotland, looks especially striking with its carpet of autumn leaves:

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Trail

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Quotidian

For this week’s Tuesday Challenge, Frank at Dutch Goes The Photo! has set the theme of ‘quotidian’, in the sense of the normal everyday that could, in photographic terms, repay a closer view or a different perspective.

What could be more humdrum than a drain, you may wonder? But this drain-cover in the gutter of a street in Chabanais is surely worth a second glance, not only for the interesting structure of the ironwork, but also for the contrast provided by the autumn leaves that have become trapped in it.

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Quotidian

Weekly Photo Challenge: It IS Easy Being Green

A sunny autumn day in Inverleith Park, Edinburgh. The leaves are beginning to turn, but green still predominates.

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: It IS Easy Being Green

Tuesdays of Texture: Autumn Leaves

For my latest contribution to Narami’s Tuesday of Texture challenge at De Monte Y Mar, this is a photograph I took only last Sunday afternoon on a stroll around our local village. Plenty of textures here, as autumn leaves pile up on the tarmac against this old metal gate:

autumn-leaves

 

Macro Moments Week 15: Thistle

‘Fall’ (which is to say ‘autumn’) is the theme for Musin’ with Susan’s Macro Moments Challenge this week.

It’s certainly getting to that time of year when the seedheads have done their work, as on this thistle in our garden (where it obviously has no right to be…)

thistle

Macro Moments Week 15

Guiding the viewer

The latest task in Cee’s Compose Yourself Photo Challenge is to guide the viewer: in other words, to compose your image so that the viewer focuses on what you want them to see within it, rather than be distracted or have their attention drawn away from what they ‘ought’ to be looking at.

Bright Spot

Bright Spot Before

The intended subject of this image, of a church interior in Rochechouart, is the decoration on the columns and walls on the left, but the eye can’t help but be drawn to the bright spot of the stained glass window on the right: so it has to go, leaving the focus of the image as it was intended:

Bright Spot After

The S Curve

A curved object in an image is almost always more interesting and attention-drawing than a straight line and, as Cee points out, it’s a common and perfectly respectable technique in pictures involving roads. Here are two images (the one on the right is a cropped version of the first) of light trails at the T-junction. Apart from eliminating the distractions of the vehicles stopped at the lights on the bottom left, the tighter crop’s curve also takes precedence in the eye over the otherwise intrusive angular traffic-light gantries.

Flipping The Horizon

Sometimes you take a photograph and it’s fine – except that you wish it could be the other way round – a mirror image. Of course, through the miracle of editing software it’s now very simple to get the image you want simply by flipping it. The two images below (taken just along the road on a sunny autumn day last year) are identical in every respect except that one is the mirror image of the other. Can you guess which was the original and – more to the point – which one do you prefer?

(Sometimes an image can also benefit from being flipped upside down, as I did recently in my contribution to the June One Photo Focus.)

Weekly Photo Challenge: Seasons

In 2014 I set myself a project to record the passing seasons by every month taking a photograph of the field behind our house, from the same point of view. This week’s Photo Challenge provides an ideal opportunity to show the results.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Seasons