Under pressure

As part of the wine-making process, in Bordeaux as elsewhere, the young wine has to be drawn out of the big stainless steel tanks into smaller containers under the force of gravity. Given how large the tanks are, it’s not surprising that it comes out at high pressure. That’s what you call letting it breathe.

And if you zoom in closely enough, it becomes almost abstract:

liquid

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Liquid

Tuesdays of Texture: Paper

The Moulin du Gôt is an historic working paper-mill near St Leonard de Noblat, in the Limousin region. Paper is still made there using traditional methods and from some unusual primary materials – not just wood and linen, but various vegetal matter (leeks, for example). Some of the papers they produce are used to make lampshades with fascinating textures:

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Tuesdays of Texture: Week 35

Macro Moments: Week 7

Another open topic this week for the macro challenge hosted by Musin’ with Susan. This is my third contribution and so far I’ve posted a flower and a dragonfly, so perhaps it’s time for something inanimate.

This is the very end of an extremely long soap bubble that my grandson blew last year.

It reminds me of a very early Pink Floyd lightshow (note to younger viewers: trust me on this one – you had to be there).

Bubble

Macro Moments: Week 7

Weekly Photo Challenge: Abstract

According to the Tate Gallery, “abstract art is art that does not attempt to represent an accurate depiction of a visual reality but instead uses shapes, colours, forms and gestural marks to achieve its effect”.

I think this qualifies. It was taken in front of the huge aquarium inside Dubai Mall, and illustrates what happens when you have to use a long exposure in a dimly-lit space and somebody barges into you just as you press the shutter.

Abstract2

The smaller image below shows what  it would have looked like without the introduction of the third-party camera shake. Frankly, I prefer the abstract version (it’ll probably come as no surprise to  learn that I like tie-dye too).

Abstract1

Weekly Photo Challenge: Abstract

 

One Photo Focus: March 2016

This month’s One Photo Focus Challenge, provided by Nancy Merrill, had me thinking. Here is the original:

DSC_8506

I felt that there were two possible approaches:

A matter of record

Shakespeare record

This first edit sees the image as a ‘record shot’ (absolutely no disparagement intended). Essentially, all this requires is a modicum of straightening and  a sympathetic crop to highlight the sign and put it into some context – so here we can see the structure of the theatre and the fact that it is located in a green (or at least non-urban) area.

Abstract form

Shakespeare abstract

It looks like this theatre has been built along the lines of Shakespeare’s Globe in London (which I’ve been fortunate enough to attend for quite a few performances over the years). The key architectural characteristic is undoubtedly the black and white ‘mock-Tudor’ effect, which is a worthy subject in itself. Consequently, I cropped down to the bottom left quadrant of the original image, flipped it a quarter-turn clockwise, tweaked for sharpness and added a little grain and a vignette to produce this almost abstract interplay of light and shade, straight and diagonal lines.

One Photo Focus March 2016

Patterns in mosaic

This is a detail from an intricately patterned mosaic in the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi. Islam discourages, or in some cases completely forbids, the creation of images of humans and all sentient beings. Accordingly, the development of art has focused to a great extent on geometrical patterns.

(You’ll have to believe me when I say that I’d already selected this image before I saw the one featured in Cee’s post)

Pattern

 

 

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Patterns

Walkway

For this week’s challenge, here’s another image from the Burjuman Centre in Dubai, showing a section of the walkway on the top floor. The starburst effect on the lights is a real bonus here.

WalkwayB&W

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Indoor Walkways