Weekly Photo Challenge: Orange

This week’s challenge asks us to feature the colour orange in a gallery. Ours not to reason why, so here are three images heavy on the orange:

1) A spectacular sunset over Beverley in Yorkshire

2) Part of the innards of a vintage tractor, taken at the display of old-time cars and agricultural machinery in Lesterps

3) All I know about this is that it’s a flower and I took the photograph in Abu Dhabi. Anybody know what it is?

(Incidentally, apart from some cropping of the second and third, there’s been no post-processing of any of these images. Which is unusual for me.)

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Rule of Thirds

For this week’s challenge, a photograph of some seedpods of an Honesty plant (known in France as ‘monnaie du Pape’ – The Pope’s Money). I do like a bit of bokeh.

Rule of Thirds

 

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Gone But Not Forgotten

A discarded flower, perhaps given added poignancy by the fact that it had been a buttonhole worn at a wedding I attended last summer.

Gone

Photography 101: Double

These popped up together earlier this year in a window box that had been sewn with an unspecified seed mixture.

Respecting the brief for today’s challenge, the image has been rotated 90° anti-clockwise into a landscape view, which certainly looks more compelling than the ‘as shot’ portrait mode (look at it sideways and you’ll see what I mean).

Double

 

Photography 101: Nature

This certainly comes under the category of nature. Despite appearances, it’s not a cartoon octopus but actually a chrysanthemum bud, which I took in early September this year in our garden.

Thinking about looking at common things from a different perspective, I rotated the image 90 degrees clockwise, which I think makes it a bit more interesting.

Nature

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Texture

Macro is a good way to discover texture. This is the stamen of a lily. Try not to get the pollen on your clothes: it’ll never come off.

Lily

Monet’s Garden

I recently visited Monet’s Garden, in Normandy. You’ve probably heard of it, and of Monet himself, the founder of Impressionism.

The garden itself is rightly famous, although I was surprised to discover that almost all of the plants there are quite common varieties, rather than horticultural curiosities. What grabs the attention is the way they are all closely planted in what is a comparatively small space.

The overall impact is quite stunning, but for me the details were even more impressive. Clever old thing, Nature.

 

Monet5