Perspectives on the Pont Valentre

The Pont Valentré, which bridges the river Lot in Cahors, dates from the fourteenth century, so certainly qualifies for Cee’s category this week of anything over 50 years old.

Then again, so do I….

The bridge’s four towers makes it visually appealing not only from a distance but also – unlike some – when you’re actually standing on it.

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Over 50 years old

Thursday Doors: Encore Cahors

After our little diversion to Rancon over the past two weeks, it’s time to dip back into the cornucopia of interesting doors from Cahors.

Last time we featured some of the doors from the Cathedral of Saint-Etienne, one of two principal landmarks of the town. The other is the Pont Valentré:

There must be literally hundreds of doors in the narrow streets of the medieval quarter, although they aren’t all original or neglected:

Finally for this week, and just for a change, how about an artfully rusted gate?

Thursday Doors 12 April 2018

The old staircase

This ancient and very worn staircase can be found on the Pont Valentre in the town of Cahors, in southern France.

Amazingly, worn as it is and with no handrail, it is not roped off in any way to prevent public access. It would take a brave or foolhardy soul to climb it, though, however impressive the views over the River Lot might be from the top.

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Structure

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Bridge

Frank’s theme for this week is ‘Bridge’, so here’s a twofer: two of the bridges that span the River Lot in the town of Cahors.

This more modern road bridge isn’t too shabby, especially when the shadows make it look a little like a set of nutcrackers:

…although the famous one is the medieval Pont Valentré:

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Bridge

Thursday Doors: Cahors (2)

More doors from Cahors, he said rhymingly.

After the helter-skelter mini-train journey that featured last week, a more leisurely approach, with a cruise on the River Lot that runs through the town and beneath the striking three-towered, medieval Pont Valentré, which is worth seeing in all its glory:

Although to maintain the door theme, here’s a close-up of the middle tower:

Here’s another door halfway up a wall, taken from the mini-train:

Finally, a few more down-to-earth examples:

Thursday Doors 19 October 2017