Thursday Doors: Return To Cahors (3)

A third instalment of doors from last month’s trip to Cahors. To start with, three doors featuring progressively more elaborate carving.

The first two are also examples of old doors juxtaposed with more modern ones:

These next two could be described as a ‘before and after’:

And finally a door that isn’t brown:

(There are plenty more doors to come from Cahors, but for the next couple of weeks, just for the sake of variety, I’ll be posting some samples from another more leisurely re-visit to a place that’s featured here before.)

Thursday Doors 22 March 2018

Thursday Doors: Return to Cahors (2)

This week, another selection of images from my recent doorscursion to the town of Cahors. Last week I mentioned that a notable feature was the elaborate carving to be seen on many doors, including this notable example.

Cahors has an impressive cathedral, with the comparatively unusual feature of two domes. It’s arguably more impressive inside than out, but it does have some well maintained doors:

Another feature of the doors of Cahors is that it is quite common to find an ancient door in the middle of a row of more modern frontages, as in the first image and also, more clearly,here:

Finally, another example of the juxtaposition of old and new(er):

Thursday Doors 15 March 2018

Thursday Doors: Return to Cahors

Regular readers – small, select, yet discerning band that you are – may just recall that last October I put up a couple of posts of doors from the southern French town of Cahors. Most of those images were snatched from a little tourist train, driven by a man with a mission to be somewhere else in a hurry. Consequently,  many of the images fell even further short of acceptable standards of sharpness and composition than is usually the case.

However, Madame and I enjoyed our first visit so much that recently we returned for a more leisurely couple of days’ exploration. We’re very glad we did, because it is a delightful place with a sizeable medieval quarter, boasting a considerable number of highly photogenic doors that I missed the first time around. So, in the coming weeks, expect scores more doors from Cahors.

May as well start at  the beginning; this was the first door I photographed on my recent trip. It’s not even in the old quarter, but it does feature some interesting carved detail, which proved to be quite a common feature, I discovered.

…and where there isn’t so much carved detail, ironwork seems to be the acceptable alternative:

Or you can just have plain old, largely unembellished doors:

Over time, it’s inevitable that some doors will have become redundant and been repurposed:

While some more modern examples clearly still function:

Finally, for this week, a somewhat more colourful example. This gateway leads to what was a medieval hospital.

Thursday Doors 8 March 2018

Weekly Photo Challenge: Out of this world

In modern times, the power of religion is much diluted. However, it is important to remember that at one time the grandeur of great cathedrals – now often faded – was designed to impress a superstitious and almost certainly illiterate populace.

Both the architecture and the decor were intended to provide an idea of the glories of the life hereafter: literally out of this world.

Even now, the twin domes of the cathedral of Cahors can still impress even the most determinedly secular of observers.

Weekly Photo Challenge 28 February 2018

The old staircase

This ancient and very worn staircase can be found on the Pont Valentre in the town of Cahors, in southern France.

Amazingly, worn as it is and with no handrail, it is not roped off in any way to prevent public access. It would take a brave or foolhardy soul to climb it, though, however impressive the views over the River Lot might be from the top.

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Structure

Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflecting on 2017

The final WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge of the year is to post the ‘most meaningful’ photograph that we’ve taken in 2017.

I was surprised to discover that my Lightroom catalogue has expanded by well over 2,000 during the course of this year, so there’s plenty to choose from. I wouldn’t describe any of them as being particularly  ‘meaningful’; I just enjoy ‘spotting’ images and capturing them in photographs.

Probably my favourite subject, though, is reflections, so here are two images (I coudn’t choose between them) that haven’t been posted before.

The first was taken from a boat on the River Lot in the town of Cahors and is of a buoy, which has the inestimable advantage of constituting a red foreground object. I also like the contrast between the sharpness of the buoy and the blur of the reflected trees and buildings. With a bit of post-processing, it’s also possible to see why it’s there.

The second is of the River Vienne in the town of Chabanais on a peerlessly calm and sunny day: in October, no less.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Best of 2017

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Bridge

Frank’s theme for this week is ‘Bridge’, so here’s a twofer: two of the bridges that span the River Lot in the town of Cahors.

This more modern road bridge isn’t too shabby, especially when the shadows make it look a little like a set of nutcrackers:

…although the famous one is the medieval Pont Valentré:

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Bridge