Thursday Doors: Chateau de Meillant (1)

After a visit to the restored Cistercian Abbey at Noirlac, feautured last week, we visited Chateau de Meillant, a very grand edifice that has ben in the same family for over 500 years.

How they made it through the French Revolution without an appointment with Madame Guillotine I don’t know, but the current owner lives in one wing, of which this is the main door:

The rest of the house is open to the public and is richly endowed with period features, taking photographs of which is forbidden – not least because they sell more guide-books that way. On the outside, though, there are plenty of Gothic doors to admire:

Behind the chateau is what used to be the servants’ quarters:

and the stable block, which now houses a collection of vintage cars:

Next week more from Chatea de Meillant, including some rather less pristine examples.

Thursday Doors 20 July 2017

Thursday Doors: Noirlac

Last month we went on a day’s outing by coach with a local group. In the afternoon we visited an ornate chateau (watch this space…) but we began at the restored Cistercian Abbey at Noirlac, in central France.

A slightly different take on ‘doors within doors’:

If anything, the interior is even more impressive:

Although the requirements of modern life can sometimes be a little jarring (that silver column is an air-conditioning unit, I think):

And it’s always nice to see the backs of doors:

Thursday Doors 13 July 2017

Thursday Doors: Gates of St-Barbant and St-Martial

As promised last week, here is a final collection of images from the conjoined villages of Saint-Barbant and Saint-Martial-sur-Isop, focussing – just for a change – on gates.

Or rather, in this case, gateposts:

An unusually long and well cared-for example:

And it’s nice to see that the cemetery is looked after:

But oh dear…

Next week, something rather different: a restored Cistercian Abbey.

Thursday Doors 6 July 2017

Thursday Doors: Saint-Martial-sur-Isop – Finale (almost)

This will be the final set of doors from the nearby village of Saint-Martial-sur-Isop, although we haven’t quite seen the last of what it has to offer…

Last week we faded out to grey and now we’re picking up where we left off. The legend over the larger door reads ‘Vins en gros’ and the date 1895, so this used to be the premises of a wholesale wine merchant.

It wouldn’t be a village if it didn’t have a church and this one, although quite small, is very interesting. The original building is believed to date back to the Carolingian period (987-1268), although what’s visible today is 12th century (with subsequent renovations and additions).

And finally, as regards doors, some houses in rather better condition than some of the ones we’ve seen:

Next week, before moving on elsewhere, some of the gates to be seen in Saint-Martial and Saint-Barbant.

Thursday Doors 29 June 2017

 

 

Thursday Doors: Saint Martial-sur-Isop (2) – Fade To Grey

Last week’s selection of doors to be found in the nearby village of Saint-Martial-sur-Isop had in common the fact that they were all quite colourful. This week’s doors, however, are gradually having the colour bleached out of them.

To maintain some continuity with last week, though, here’s a still quite chirpy example:

But now it’s downhill all the way, starting with this fading green door that is accessible only by a crumbling wooden staircase that nobody in their right mind would use:

And now, in progressive stages of abandoned neglect:

Until finally we get to a building where even the vegetation’s given up:

‘Oh well, a touch of grey/Kinda suits you anyway”

Next week, proof that it’s not all doom and gloom in St-Martial.

Thursday Doors 22 June 2017

Thursday Doors: Saint-Martial-sur-Isop (1)

Moving on from Saint-Barbant, this is – depending on the direction of approach – either the first or last house in Saint-Martial-sur-Isop. Either way, it’s right on the border between the two communes:

It’s a shame that this little door, being set back from the surrounding buildings, rather hides its light under a bushel, because it’s a lovely colour:

However, this has always been my favourite door in Saint-Martial:

This smaller image may give a better idea of the scale:

And it looks like they may have shared a pot of paint with their neighbours:

Enough to do the side door and window too:

And finally for this week, another green door. This one is on the Mairie:

Thursday Doors 15 June 2017

Thursday Doors: Saint-Barbant (2)

This week, some more of the doors on offer in the little village of Saint-Barbant.

Ever since I got bitten by the Doors bug (cheers Norm), I have looked at this stretch of wall as we drive through Saint-Barbant and thought that it needs to be explored in more detail:

Yes, a whole range of doors that aren’t doors any more:

This one in particular intrigues me. The brick surround is obviously comparatively modern, and while it’s common enough to see old doors blocked up, in this case it must have happened relatively recently:

Moving on to actual doors, but keeping the blocked-up theme, here’s a proper door and an ex-window:

I’ve always liked the ironwork on the doors of the church  (that notice on the left is, sadly, a sign of the times: one has been placed on all public buildings in France as part of the continuing State of Emergency):

Just along from the church is the former tram station: Saint-Barbant was one of the main stations on the Limousin network (although you’d never guess that now), which is why this is more than twice as big as the typical tram stop:

And finally something a little different and definitely prosaic. I think it may once have been used for chickens:

Next week the caravan moves on fifty yards down the road to Saint-Martial-sur-Isop.

Thursday Doors 8 June 2017