Aspirational

A shop sign near Circular Quay in the centre of Sydney.

PPAC #15 24 September 2021

Not Your Average Knocker

The Public Art Challenge is all about portraying items that are visible from the street, so what could be more out in the open than a door knocker?

This one, in the medieval quarter of the city of Cahors, in south-west France, is a little out of the ordinary in a macabre kind of way.

PPAC 18 September 2021

Look At The Baby…

In one of the narrow, winding streets around the great cathedral of Chartres, I spotted this slightly disconcerting sign featuring a baby. The presence of the passing pedestrian helped to make the shot.

PPAC 3 September 2021

Pulling in the punters

The picturesque city of Perigueux is (in normal times) a popular tourist destination. Inevitably that means there are lots of shops, all competing for footfall from passers-by. Signs alone are not enough in some cases.

PPAC 6 August 2021

Needing No Introduction…

Is there anyone who didn’t recognise the Sydney Opera House?

Viewed here in the frame created by part of the rigging of a tourist boat

PPAC 23 July 2021

Against Bric-a-Brac?

At first glance, this ancient and well-weathered sign in the city of Cahors appears to read ‘anti-brocante’, but in fact it’s just old and bent (don’t say it) and actually reads ‘Brocante Brocante”.

So good they named it twice, presumably.

For non-francophones, a brocante is essentially a bric-à-brac shop. You know: the sort of place whose owners buy junk and sell antiques.

Posted for the Photographing Public Art Challenge, hosted this week by Cee

The Convict

I thought I might start playing along with the new Photographing Public Art Challenge (PPAC) that is being curated in alternate weeks by Cee Neuner and Marsha Ingrao. As usual, I’ve turned up late, so this is Week 2.

The idea is to post an image of any example of public art, which is defined as any art form (buildings, statues, graffiti, paintings etc) that is plainly visible from a public place. There’s certainly never going to be a shortage of potential subjects.

My initial contribution is ‘The Convict’. This carving in sandstone can be found in the oldest part of Sydney, around Circular Quay. It’s one of a series portraying historical characters. The ‘real’ shackles certainly bring it to life. I suppose you could say that they are quite arresting.

PPAC 25 June 2021