Porte de l’Officialite

The little Rue Saint-Yves lies within the bounds of Chartres cathedral. The gateway dates from 1257. It is known as the Porte de l’Officialité because in medieval times it provided access to the Ecclesiastical Tribunal.

My thanks to the unknown lady who appeared from around the corner just as I was taking the shot. She made all the difference, not least in giving an idea of the scale of the Cathedral itself.

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Roads

The glass roof

The glass roof of the covered open-air vegetable market in the city of Chartres is replete with symmetrical lines and angles to meet Cee’s theme for this week (and works particularly well in monochrome).

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Lines and Angles

Thursday Doors: Chartres – final instalment

A last set of doors from the cathedral town of Chartres. Most of these are well cared-for, but interesting nonetheless:

I don’t really understand why the railings on this window are on the inside:

More tidy doors:

For the sake of variety, a blue door, slightly tatty:

And, to finish with, a door and an ex-door next to each other:

Thursday Doors 27 April 2017

Thursday Doors: Chartres – Down to earth

After last week’s exploration of the cathedral, we’re back to secular Chartres for the next instalment. However, to ease us back in to less spiritual matters here are a couple of images of doors from the immediate environs of the Cathedral.

These doors are in the gardens immediately surrounding the cathedral itself. I suspect it’s where they keep the lawnmower.

This building houses one of the administrative offices of the cathedral:

And, inevitably, there’s the souvenir shop…

Speaking of shops:

One practical problem for the door-hunter in Chartres is that the street are narrow, even before taking into account the cars that are parked all along them, so it’s not always possible to get a ‘head-on’ view…

…although we do our best.

Thursday Doors 20 April 2017

Thursday Doors: Chartres Cathedral

As promised, this week we feature some of the mightily impressive doors of the great cathedral of Chartres, often said to be the most beautiful cathedral in France and certainly a high point of French Gothic architecture dating from the late twelfth and early thirteenth centuries.

As you would expect, the principal entrances seek to impress:

As I recall, my second-ever contribution to Thursday Doors was this mouse’s-eye view of one of the main entrances:

It’s worth seeing from the inside too:

This is the entrance to the crypt:

And finally, this qualifies as a door, I think, although technically speaking it’s actually a reredos – a screen that once stood behind the high altar, but is now just propped up against a wall:

Next week we’re back to the usual diet of tatty secular doors.

Thursday Doors 13 April 2017

Thursday Doors: Chartres (1)

After last week’s detour around redundant shopfronts, we’re back on more familiar ground with the first of a few posts featuring doors from the cathedral city of Chartres. Next week I’ll focus on the cathedral itself, but for now, to maintain some sort of continuity with last week’s post, let’s start with a couple of commercial premises that are obviously still going concerns:

Shutters count, don’t they?

A couple of old doors from the same residential street in the old part of the town:

And this one is obviously a replacement of the original:

Finally for this week, the premises of an Appart’Hotel (for self-catering holidays):

Thursday Doors 6 April 2017

Tuesdays of Texture: Sculpted Saints

Lots of texture in this detail of a selection of saints to be found at Chartres Cathedral:

More submissions to Narami’s weekly challenge can be found here