Weekly Photo Challenge: Letters

There are 26 letters in the English alphabet which, put together in various combinations, is enough to make up millions of words.

Unfortunately, though, sometimes – as in this textile shop in the Dubai souq – what seems like a logical juxtaposition can convey quite the wrong message…

Letters

A Close Look At Quilts

Madame and I recently had the opportunity to attend the International Quilt Show in Dubai, organised by Classic Quilts Dubai.

You don’t have to be a quilter in order to appreciate the talent and effort that goes into producing these works of art. And for a photographer, there’s a whole world of colour and pattern to admire, enjoy and seek to capture.

There is also texture and that’s what I’ve focused (sic) on here. These photographs show some of the detailed work in a selection of the quilts that were on display. They stand alone as images, but they also give a further impression of the extent of the work involved in the quilting process.

Images of the quilts in their entirety can be found by following the link to Classic Quilts Dubai provided above, or on their Facebook page.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Monument

It’s a moot point whether the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi has been around for long enough to qualify as a monument, but it’s certainly monumental…

Monument

Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflections

Lots of glass-faced buildings in Abu Dhabi…

Reflection

Weekly Photo Challenge: Inside

There is a very romantic private resort in Oman called Zighy Bay. It has a tower, on the roof of which it is possible to dine by candlelight. To get to the roof, you need to go inside, and up this spiral staircase. It’s worth it.

Inside

Weekly Photo Challenge: Perspective

This is the building in Abu Dhabi where I used to work…

ADIA

…fortunately, not as a window cleaner.

Window cleaners

(Happily, they now have proper cradles for the job)

Weekly Photo Challenge: Abandoned

Oradour-sur-Glane is a village not far from here. In 1944 it was the scene of a Nazi atrocity, which can be read about here.

A new village was built nearby after the war, but the original is now preserved as a permanent museum and memorial to the 642 named victims.

Abandoned