Tuesday Photo Challenge: Growth

Frank’s theme for this week’s Tuesday Photo Challenge is ‘Growth’, so flowers seems like a logical place to go to find an appropriate image, notwithstanding that I posted a picture of some roses last time.

I saw this tightly packed group of lily buds in the Botanical Gardens in Sydney a few years ago. There’s plenty of potential growth here and perhaps the tight crop lifts the shot a little out of the ordinary.

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Growth

Not your average windsock

For this week’s Fun ‘Foto’ Challenge, Cee wants to see at least four colours of the rainbow. This windsock with a full rainbow of colours was seen at the annual Air Show at nearby Blond.

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Rainbow

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Rose

Frank’s chosen the topic of ‘Rose’ for this week’s Tuesday Photo Challenge. I have no shortage of images of roses in my library, so the only problem was selecting one previously unposted. I think this fits the bill. It’s a French rose called ‘Pierre de Ronsard’ and I saw it last year at the annual festival of roses at Doué-La-Fontaine

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Rose

A sense of perspective

For this week’s Black & White Photo Challenge, Cee wants to see something ‘in the distance’. Perhaps like the main road that can just be seen at the far end of this narrow passageway in the medieval quarter of the town of Perigueux.

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: In The Distance

The Petrified Caves

Well, it’s certainly true that Black & White can be fun, so why shouldn’t it be a subject for Cee’s Fun ‘Foto’ challenge?

In the petrified caves (‘grottes pétrifiantes’) near Villandry, a steady drip of water percolating through the limestone has produced some bizarre shapes, such as this, which reminds me of something from the fevered imagination of H P Lovecraft.

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Black & White

The Lantern of the Dead

Although there apparently remains only one example in Britain, ‘lanterns of the dead (Lanternes des Morts) can still be seen in rural France and there are a couple of (fairly) local examples.

And what, you may be asking, is a Lanterne des Morts? This is how Wikipedia describes it:

“Lanternes des morts) are small stone towers found chiefly in the centre and west of France, pierced with small openings at the top, where a light was exhibited at night to indicate the position of a cemetery. These towers were usually circular, with a small entrance in the lower part giving access to the interior, so as to raise the lamps by a pulley to the required height.”

This small photo shows the exterior of the top part of the Lanterne in the village of Rancon:

However, Cee’s Black & White Challenge this week calls  for unusual perspectives, so this is what you would see if you were small enough to get inside the base of the tower and look up towards the sky.

 

Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Unusual Perspectives

Thursday Doors: West London

Late last year we went and stayed for a few days with our son and daughter-in-law, who recently moved down from Edinburgh to London, where they have bought a lovely house in the west London suburb of Chiswick. These are a few of the doors I noticed on our (many) dog-walking expeditions. Rather different from the usual diet here of tatty rural French doors, but a change is as good as a rest.

It’s fair to assume that this is not the only door belonging to this house:

This one boasts a closed-in porch:

While this one goes for the grand porticoed look:

But if you really want grand, you need to visit the Grade 1 listed Chiswick House, formerly the London residence of the Duke of Devonshire, but now a public park. This is ‘just’ the side view:

Finally, a couple of more prosaic ‘tradesmen’s entrances’

Thursday Doors 17 January 2019